Tag Archive | Garden Design

Trust Yourself As A Gardener

I promised a post about cutting back roses. I don’t actually grow any roses that have to be cut back at the moment. Everything I grow is technically deemed a “shrub” rose which means that in the spring that only dead wood is trimmed off.

But it wasn’t always this way. I used to grow hybrid teas on occasion. And the first roses I ever grew were floribundas, which is a funky cross between a hybrid tea and a shrub rose.

They grew quite well considering they were in heavy clay and in a spot that wasn’t the sunniest I had (they were where the hydrangea hedge is now so that tells you it wasn’t a terribly sunny spot!). But the interesting thing was that the Spoiler and I chose them and planted them together–one of the few gardening things that we actually did together. Usually it’s all me.

So about November of that first gardening year, the Spoiler came to me and asked, “Aren’t you going to cut back the roses?” or “Isn’t it time to cut back the roses?” or some such question. Needless to say, I looked at him as if he had sprouted 3 heads. I certainly don’t do any gardening in November. And I couldn’t imagine what he was talking about.

He was fairly persistent about this. “You have to cut them back. It’s what you do,” he told me. And although I began to feel like a cranky three year old, I asked him, “Why?”

“Well, if you don’t, they’ll all whip around in the wind and die back.”

At that point, I really felt as if I had entered some alternate reality. You were cutting a living plant back because you didn’t want it to die? Who invented that rule?

So I tried logic with him. “Let’s try it my way. Let’s not cut them back. That way if a 5 foot shrub whips around and dies back, we might start with a 3 foot shrub next spring.  If we do it your way and cut them back to a 3 foot shrub now, what happens if we have a hard winter and the plant dies back anyway? We’ll be starting with a 1 foot plant. Do we really want that?”

So we tried it my way. And gradually, because of sun issues, we moved the rose garden out near the street where the roses regularly get blasted by the snow plows. And we still don’t cut them back. And they survive just fine–a little bit of breakage from the heavy snow thrown by the plows, but nothing terrible.

So if you have a good reason for doing something in the garden, try it. What’s the worst that could happen? A plant dies, perhaps? Isn’t that how we all learn as gardeners?

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“Fall” Colors

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This is a close-up of the shot of my steps from the Friday post. You can see the crotons better,  and you can see the calibrachoa, or million bells, in the pots beneath the 2 larger ones. They are a mix–great variety called Dreamsicle that I planted for the first time this year, and a double yellow.  Not only do they nicely highlight the colors in the crotons’ leaves, but for this time of year, they are great fall color. Dreamsicle is a mix of salmon, and orange flowers.

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Here’s the back wall of the steps, where the  sweet potato vine is. You can see it, along with the little bowl of succulents  (which has been there all summer,  but was overshadowed by the hibiscus and mandevilla) are now color-echoing the begonias.

It doesn’t take much to make these changes.  Look around your own yard to see what you have to work with.

Wordless Wednesday

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Before “summer” ends for real, I wanted to post this creative garden bench that someone in a neighboring town has outside.

Also notice the fence of espaliered trees. The town wouldn’t let them fence with the wrought iron as they did on the side street so they had to get creative.

The trees may not have been their first choice–but how pretty this all turned out!

Wordless Wednesday–Made in the Shade

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This combination of containers holds house plants, perennials, tender perennials and annuals. All of them are shade lovers and they are staged on an old set of back porch steps under a dogwood tree that throws some pretty dense shade.

Behind them, planted in the bed, you can see hosta, euonymous, ajuga and hellbores.

Who says that shade plants can’t be colorful?

Road Trip!

Bradley Estate Formal Garden close up

So who’s taking a road trip to Massachusetts this summer? Probably lots of folks are coming to the beach at Cape Cod, right? And many more might be visiting Boston (I hope–such a great city–so much to see and do there)

If you’re in Massachusetts and you’re a gardener, don’t miss this neat new display garden that’s been set up at the Eleanor Cabot Bradley Estate in Canton, Massachusetts. That’s a photo of the garden, above, thoughtfully provided by its “caretakers” the Trustees of the Reservation.

The all-summer exhibit is called “Violet Riot” and it opens next Wednesday June 14.  It features purple and chartreuse annuals and perennials. There are featured annual, perennial and shrub talks scheduled (see the sidebar in the press release) as well as concerts scheduled throughout the summer.

Canton, Massachusetts is about 30 miles from Boston–not too far for a weekend trip–and its accessible from Routes 128 or I-93.

Bradley in Bloom Plantings Collage

And one of the great things about visiting display gardens is that you always come away from them with ideas for your own gardens–even if you don’t necessarily like purple and chartreuse!  I am sure that many of the plant varieties used also come in other colors as well. You can see by just this photo, again provided by the Trustees, that the plant palette is richer and more varied than you might expect.

So if you are in the area, stop by this neat garden and have a look around. I am sure you will enjoy it and take home at least one idea for your own garden!

Mulching With Grass?

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You have probably heard of mulching your plants with grass clippings. This is a good way to use up clippings that may be a little too long to leave on your lawn. If, however,  you choose to do this,  you’re going to want to evaluate how “weed free” your lawn is. There’s no point in introducing lawn clippings that are filled with weed seeds.

And you definitely can’t do it if you have treated your lawn with a four step program.  The “Step 2” part of that program contains a herbicide that definitely has the potential to harm your plants. And perish the thought that you might think of using lawn pesticide treated grass around your edibles!

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This year I am unfortunately growing my own grass as mulch. It wasn’t something I planned–not like my moss and fern gardens in other words. But just as the gardening season started,  I have needed some more surgery for skin cancer, this time in a tricky spot on my back.

So I was able to get a little bit of planting done early, and now I am done for several weeks. My neighbors are just going to have to put up with the “grass mulch” look.

But heck, so long as they keep catching all my cancers early, I will put up with some gardening inconvenience!  I am grateful.