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Wordless Wednesday–Accidental Pollinator Habitats

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There’s a lot of talk these days about “post-wild” planting. And while I haven’t read that particular book, I have read Larry Weaner’s books and been to a couple of his talks on habitat plantings and succession plantings. From what I can glean from interviews with the “post-wild” author, he has made habitat and succession planting just a whole lot more complicated than it needs to be! But maybe I need to read his book–perhaps I do him a disservice.

Take a look here. These are two native plants that have sprung up under my star magnolia. The Spoiler keeps wanting to “pull out the weeds.” I keep telling him that he’d better not, on pain of death (besides, good luck getting out the goldenrod. Its roots are incredibly deep!)

The taller, darker one on the end with the lance shaped leaves is goldenrod. The one in the foreground is a shorter lived succession plant called either white snakeroot, or boneset, depending on which common name you prefer. It actually migrated here from the edge of our woodlands. There is still a little bit there, but it obviously prefers this sunnier spot. Both of these are pollinator magnets, as I will show you later this summer.

What’s left in the woods? White wood aster, also a pollinator magnet.

And what was under this tree? Nothing. We keep limbing it up to let the plants grow in.

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Here’s another “accidental” habitat that most people never see because they use 4-step programs and those programs kill clover. Clover is prime habitat for butterflies and bees. I am always amazed when I see folks walking barefoot on their lawns. I wouldn’t dare–and not because I’ve poisoned it with pesticides either!  I don’t want to accidentally step on all my precious bees!

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Finally, don’t over look habitat in the most unlikely places. This is an overly broad crack between the slates on my walk. Yes, there are too many weeds here that I need to address. But there’s lovely moss, a fern and some violets. Those get to stay.

If nature is doing your “planting” for you, why fight it?

 

Wordless Wednesday–Made in the Shade

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This combination of containers holds house plants, perennials, tender perennials and annuals. All of them are shade lovers and they are staged on an old set of back porch steps under a dogwood tree that throws some pretty dense shade.

Behind them, planted in the bed, you can see hosta, euonymous, ajuga and hellbores.

Who says that shade plants can’t be colorful?

Wordless Wednesday–Wabi-sabi Wednesday

I am not sure how long I have owned my little chipped bird. He was a “freebie.”  I brought it home from the garden center where I worked over a decade ago  ( with their blessing of course) because it was obviously not saleable.

I have a similar small bird on my desk, with just a chipped beak. It’s painted. I call it the blue bird of happiness.

Many folks couldn’t stand such “imperfections” in their lives or their gardens. For me, I find that small imperfections are what life is all about.

Wordless Wednesday

A friend from another part of the country remarked last week that we have very different plants here.

If I had to describe the quintessential New England shrub, this is it: some version of a  large rhododendron in pink, mauve, white or red. They’re everywhere right now in sizes from about 2 feet tall to ones like this that tower over my head.

They do grow in other places too but they do extremely well here in our acidic soil and normally moist climate.

As a general rule,  they prefer at least partial shade, which most of us have  because we are gardening under mature tree canopies.

And since many of those trees tend to be evergreens, oaks, or maples which compete with the “rhodies” as we affectionately call them for moisture,  it’s a good thing that they tend to be shallowly rooted as well!

Here is a close view of the flower cluster. They are stunning this time of year.

Wordless Wednesday

Usually this time of year,  I have a photo of a deutzia called Chardonnay Pearls on here. It’s one of my favorites and it’s in bloom now.  But I thought I would focus  (literally as well) on something different this year.

This is a close up of some things in the wildlife garden.  The chives are just coming into bloom.  I let this clump bloom because I have a potted clump up by the house that I use for cooking. I have another blooming clump in my vegetable garden.  You might have seen it Monday.

Blooming herbs are not only pretty but they are great for pollinators.  They often have just the sort of flowers that pollinators adore.

Of course if you intend to cook with your herbs,  you don’t want them to flower.  But most perennial herbs are so abundant that you can easily split them, keep a clump close by your kitchen for cooking and plant the rest elsewhere for pollinators.

Everyone wins!

Wordless Wednesday

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These are two bidens plants that I bought for my vegetable garden. Notice I said I bought them for my vegetable garden. It’s important to have lots of colorful, composite type flowers for pollinators in the vegetable garden.

Also notice the difference in the two types of plant tags. I don’t expect you to be able to read them. Just notice that the one on the bottom left is your standard plant tag. I’ll show you the one on the right in a moment.

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Sorry I didn’t think to clean the dirt off this one before I photo’d. I think you can still clearly see the marketing at work on this tag. It’s splashed all over with the words”bee” and “Pollinator Partnership.”

I didn’t pay anything extra for this plant–nor would I unless I were sure that the money were going to support habitat or something. But after my 5 post series on supporting merchants that support pollinators and shopping for pollinators, I thought this was a really interesting piece of marketing!

Wordless Wednesday–The Monarch

Kylee Baumle’s The Monarch: Saving Our Most-Beloved Butterfly (kindly provided by St Lynn’s Press for review,  although of course the opinion expressed herein is my own) has a bit of something for most readers. There’s a naturalist component,  a good deal of gardening,  and even some crafts and recipes thrown in.

Incidentally,  for those of you who might wonder why I am always raving about how wonderful the books from St. Lynn’s Press are, this is one of the reasons.  They are just so interesting!  While other books might focus on merely gardening for butterflies,  or perhaps the life cycle of the monarchs and its migration journey,  not Ms. Baumle’s. We  get it all.

We also get the best varieties of milkweed to grow,  an extremely well-done discussion about why one particular annual milkweed is not really recommended, and a moving story about a tagged butterfly that she found.

She even gives a shout out to the various citizen science projects you can join (including the Million Pollinator Project that I have just finished  posting about).

In short,  for all things monarch, this book is excellent.  It’s highly comprehensive and yet really readable at the same time. It’s a wonderful addition to my library!