Garden Trends–Natural Pest Control

This is a trend? Integrated pest management? Seriously?

If it is, I am very grateful–but I know it’s been a “thing” among gardeners who weren’t quite totally organic for years. Even gardeners who weren’t entirely committed to using no pesticides or only organic pesticides would “buy ladybugs” or some such thing in an attempt to keep insects under control in their yards.

I am delighted–utterly overjoyed really–to see whatever it is that home gardeners are willing to do that doesn’t involve putting things that endanger insects, bees, birds and bats on their lawns and gardens. Because once gardeners realize that all of these creatures are dedicated to the good of their yards, then I think our world literally becomes a healthier place.

One of the best thing that’s happened is an awareness of the plight of the pollinators–all the pollinators. I think people are seeing bees disappearing literally before their eyes. They don’t see butterflies anymore. They don’t see fireflies. They don’t see a lot of things that they grew up seeing–and they realize that in order to attract these things to their homes, yards, etc., they have to make some changes.

No longer is it perfectly acceptable to spray along the foundation every spring–or several times a year –just because some bugs might want to come into your house. No longer is it acceptable to put up bug zapping lights that kill moths but not mosquitoes. No longer is it acceptable treat the lawn four or more times a year when the birds–who, incidentally, are some of your best friends in the war on insects–might scoop up those little bits of fertilizers, eat them, and die. Instead, find out when your cooperative extension service or Ag station suggests that your fertilize–and only do so after a soil test, please!

And while we’re at it, to assist our friends (the birds, bats and bees) in helping us with natural pest control, let’s not manicure our lawns to within an inch of their lives. We’re not living on putting greens. Leave some nice flowers in your lawn for the early pollinators. Bees love clover and its nitrogen feeds your lawn. If you do that, you might not even need to put down a spring feeding!

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